Using Lye

by Deb Thomas
(Missouri)

I can't use Lye. Can these soap recipes be made without the lye?


Answer:

"Soap" is the result of a chemical reaction between lye and oil.

Unfortunately, it cannot be made without using lye. Even melt and pour soap you purchase was originally made using lye.

Cathy

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Other Alternatives Then Using Lye
by: Shay

If you can't use lye for what ever the reason then there are alternatives to making your own soap with the lye already added. You could purchase soap that is already made that you can rebatch and add your own ingredients. Rebatch soap is already made soap that you grate up and "cook" and add a bit of your own oils and fragrance, additives and color with out having to use Lye. It's a fairly fun and easy method and you don't have to worry about the use of Lye it's already been done for you. Or you could also use melt and pour soap that you melt down add your own additives and fragrance and color. Both methods make beautiful soap without you ever having to use Lye it's already been added for you.

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Inhaling Lye
by: Deb T

It is the inhaling of the lye that I can't do. I use the glycering cubes. Can I just add the rest of the ingredients for your soap recipes? or do I need to do things differently? I am completely new at this, but my first experience with using the lye (at a friends house), landed me in the ER. My lungs can't handle the lye that way. Using the glycerine cubes doesn't bother me though. I think it is strange but...oh well.

Thank you for your help.

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Not Inhaling The Lye
by: Shay

I think Cathy has the best answers of anyone but I will give my two cents worth. Were you not wearing a mask when you and your friend were using Lye? It is a MUST to wear a mask or make sure you are using Lye in a very well ventilated area so you don't inhale the fumes. Regardless, with rebatch soap you aren't inhaling the Lye or using it or anything. The Lye has already been added and sponified with the oils so the Lye is no longer Lye because it's been sponified with the oils. So the Lye has been turned into soap already. All your doing with a rebatch soap is exactly that rebatching it into your own soap. You don't have to add Lye to it you just need to add a bit of water to moisten it so it will melt then after it's melted or cooked is a better word then you add your oils and fragrance and color if that's what you want. It's a very easy way to make soap if you can't for any reason use Lye. The Lye has already been added and sponified so you aren't in contact with lye at all. Hope this helps.

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Using Melt and Pour Soap
by: Cathy

It's not strange Deb...just unfortunate!

Some of my recipes could be adapted to be made with melt and pour. Some would not work out so well. It's more that some of the techniques used are harder to mimic using melt and pour soap.

Cold process soap is like a pudding when it is poured. It has a light to heavy thickness and flows very differently than melt and pour soap which is very liquidy.

You can do techniques like using soap curls that you have made from melt and pour soap. You can also make many other types of embeds using melt and pour.

Any of my scent combinations can be added to a melt and pour soap base. As can most of the other optional ingredients.

Good luck,
Cathy

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Thank you
by: Deb T

Thank you both for your help.

We were wearing masks, but they think mine was snug enough and the fumes leaked through. They said normally a person wouldn't react as severly as I did, but that my lungs just wouldn't handle any kind of fumes like that.

Anyway, Thank you both for your help. I may have some more silly guestions as I go along. I have been looking on the internet and doing as much reading as I can on this, but some of it is just a bit confusing. Who better to ask then those who know what they are doing.

Again, thank you.

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using already made soap...
by: Shell

Hi, I didn't know about being able to grate bar soap & adding oil, scent & color. I'd like to try this! I'm so new at this that I'd love someone to give me a recipe. How many bars of soap to how much oil etc...
(Lye isn't something I'm ready to mess with)

Thanks so much in advance :)

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Recipe For Rebatch
by: Shay

Yes for rebatch soap you can use homemade plain bar soap unscent or scented what ever you chose. A good way to do a rebatch is either purchase soap ends and odds and soap that has lost it's scent etc and just melt it down. As for a recipe I don't follow a a recipe because I made my own homemade soap I always have soap available to rebatch if I am in the mood. As for how much of what to add, well just grate your soap up with a cheese grater, through it into a old crock pot and add a couple of tablespoons of water you don't need much just a very little bit. Then just add oils to your liking and even some shea butter etc. What ever you want to add just through some in there. Again don't go overboard a little goes along way. If you put too much in your going to end up with a very soft mushy soap. As for fragrance follow the manufacturers directions on the fragrance lables. As for color well usually you don't need to add any but you can and either way it's going to be a add color because you are using already made soaps. You can mix and match all kinds of soaps. I know some people sell odds and ends of soaps on Ebay there are even some who sell soap for the purpose of rebatching with complete instructions on Ebay. Have fun soaping and enjoy :)

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