Soap Molds and Sodium Lactate

by Tracey
(New Mexico)

I have made some custom molds for making cold process soaps and I am having inconsistent results.

The molds are 1/4"-3/8" thick and I have altered my recipe to use more palm oil to add to the hardness.

I tried placing a towel underneath,covering the tops with wax paper (less sticky than plastic), and covering them with towels to insure the curing.

Some batches come out of the molds clean and others have parts that stick to the molds making the impressions flawed.

I know I can do this! I probably have 50% success.

Are there any tips as far as pouring thin CP soaps?


Sodium lactate is often used in a soap recipe when detailed individual soap molds are used. It makes the soap harder and much easier to release from the mold while still maintaining the fine details of the mold.

The usage rate is up to 1 tsp per pound of oils in your recipe. Be sure to not use too much as it can make the soap brittle and cause cracking.

When I use sodium lactate in cold process soap, I add it right after I've poured the lye water into my oils. Some recommend adding it to your cooled lye water.

If your recipe uses full water, try reducing it as well.

For individual soap molds it might also be a good idea to place them wrapped up on a heating pad for a short time (20 minutes on medium) if you are having trouble with them going through the gel stage. Going through gel produces a harder bar faster.

Lastly, be sure to leave the soaps in their molds for a few days at least. Up to four days may be required for some recipes.

As a last resort you can place the soap molds into the freezer for a little bit and then try to remove the soap. I personally dislike this method because I think it makes the soap feel sticky...that might just be me though!

Good luck!

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Thank you
by: Anonymous

Thank you so much for your advise! I will give it a try...

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