Curing cp soap in a cold shed

by Kathryn
(England)

Hi I have been curing and making cp soaps in my shed this winter but it gets pretty cold at night.


The soaps seem ok but I have noticed the buttermilk soap sweating a bit once I go in there and put the heater on.

Will this cold temp effect my soap cure?

Thank you for your help.

Answer:

The cold will not stop your soap from curing but the fluctuations in temperature may shorten the life of your soap.

Soap is best cured and stored in a cool (not cold), dry location out of direct sunlight.

Your shed is, as you say, quite cold and with the lack of heat, it is likely somewhat damp as well.

Think of how soap reacts when you freeze it and then take it out. It sweats and becomes sticky. These are not ideal conditions for your soap to be stored in.

Can you make the soap in your shed but store it in a slightly warmer, drier location? Or do you have an area in your shed that you can provide a little bit of constant heat too?

Perhaps a closet that is insulated. Put one of those incandescent hanging metal work lights in a large metal coffee can to provide a little heat.

To reduce any excess moisture, put a desiccant like silica gel in there as well. You can find these moisture reducing systems at your hardware store.

The above method is actually the standard procedure for keeping boats and trailers from becoming damp and moldy in the winter months but I think it might work for your shed as well. Especially if you create a smaller, insulated soap curing closet.

Good luck,
Cathy

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Thank you
by: Kathryn

Hello , thank you so much for your helpful response. There was one thing I didn't make clear. The temperatures don't fluctuate much it's always pretty cold! I dream of the day when I get a warm space to work in.

Thanks again
Kathryn

Answer:

You mentioned that the soap starts to sweat when you turn the heat on in your shed to work. This is what I was referring to with the temperature fluctuation.

I can completely understand wanting a warm space! I used to have a lovely basement room totally dedicated to my soap but alas sometimes life does not go to plan and now I must take over the dining room each time I make soap. Certainly not ideal but the alternative is to stop making soap...and that is not going to happen!

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silica crystals for drying
by: Anonymous

THEY ACTUALLY NOW SELL CAT LITTER THAT IS PURE WHITE PELLETS OF SILICA. BELIEVE ME!! IVE LEARNED THE HARD WAY IF YOU NEED THE DAMPNESS OUT OF THE AIR-CUT UP SOME TULLE OR NETTING AND SCOOP SILICA INTO THE CENTER AND WIND THE TULLE CLOSED W/A RUBBER BAND,PUT A FEW AROUND YOUR SHED BUT OUT OF REACH OF ANIMALS AND KIDS OF COURSE AND IT WILL MOST DEFINITELY WORK-JUST THOUGHT IT MIGHT BE LESS EXPENSIVE TO BUY THE BIGGER BAG OF SILICA LITTER THAN A SMALLER AMOUNT ELSEWHERE-IVE NEVER LOOKED FOR IT,BUT SOME LITTERS ARE PURE SILICA PELLETS!

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cp lye soap in shed
by: Anonymous

I specifically was searching for an answer to your question as well. I live in the foothill mountains of NC. I have an awsome very old cabin (we call it 'the shanny' that I want to use to make & house my soaps in but...cold in winter, hot in summer. I would love to know what you worked out doing!??!

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